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10 Little Things That Bug Scuba Divers #scuba @ScubaDiverMagazine


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10 Little Things That Annoy Scuba Divers

#scuba #scubadiving #scubadiver
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00:00 Introduction
00:36 Right Snorkel
02:07 Oxygen Tanks
03:40 Blowing Valves
05:36 Different Gear
06:48 Ad Time
08:01 Split Fins
09:21 Tiny Bubbles
11:05 Mixed Signals
12:42 Octo Breathers
13:48 Disappearing Buddies
15:17 All The Gear

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Sarah Garrett
Sarah Garrett
5 months ago

She’s a freediver and a spearo! Freedivers often wear their snorkel on the right. Sometimes we don’t even attach them and put floats on them so our buddy can make sure they don’t float away. Other times we might just hold it or tuck it into our weight belt.

A Jones
A Jones
5 months ago

Great video. But your understanding of “tank” and “cylinder” is wrong.

A “tank” is a vessel that is permanently mounted and not removed to be filled. For example a gas tank on a vehicle, and an oxygen tank on a lunar module are both permanently fixed to the vehicle, not removed to be filled.

A “cylinder” by definition is removable. Your SCUBA cylinder isn’t permanently mounted to your back. You take it off when your not diving and to have it filled. My Coleman camp stove uses a propane CYLINDER. When its empty I throw the empty one away and screw on a full one.

Example, I have a LP fueled RV. I drive it to the LP company and they fill the TANK (it’s bolted to the vehicle frame and can’t be removed during use). At work we have a LP fueled forklift. It has an LP CYLINDER (it straps onto the rear, and we simply change cylinders when it needs a new one). Regardless of if a vessel holds gas or liquid, it is still a TANK if it’s permanently attached, or it’s a CYLINDER if it’s portable.

The 20-lbs LP Cylinder you use on your grill is a cylinder (it’s not permanently mounted to your grill) even though it contains liquid propane. The LP tank at your house that runs your heating and stove is an LP TANK, it’s not portable, usually permanently located in your back yard. The heating oil tank at your apartment is a TANK. It’s permanently affixed and you don’t take it to be filled, the oil man comes and fills it on a schedule.

Brian Rossman
Brian Rossman
6 months ago

I love my split fins, but they were not great for rescue class.

Christian Roesch
Christian Roesch
6 months ago

number one things that makes me crazy is divers wearing a snorkel. if you see a value of having a snorkel just put it in your pocket. sorry, but it looks so stupid diving with a snorkel attached to your mask.

Daniel Blair
Daniel Blair
6 months ago

Hey Mark. As a new diver that just got a whole new set of gear, what’s the best way to store this stuff? Any little tips and hacks? #AskMark

Scuba Diver Magazine
Scuba Diver Magazine
Reply to  Daniel Blair
6 months ago

Dry in a cool, dark place is usually the best for most diving equipment. Extreme temperatures, ozone and strain tend to be the worst things for dive gear.

Make sure all of your gear is washed thoroughly and dried completely before storage, that’s the most important thing.

Notechis
Notechis
6 months ago

Actually scuba divers do use oxygen “cylinders” 😉 and actually pure oxygen isn’t toxic in shallow waters 😏.

TeresaK
TeresaK
6 months ago

1. Divers who brag about how much air they have left.
2. Photographers who don’t get out of the way or give others a moment for a quick photo.
3. Divers who wait until dive time to START getting ready.

Mark Hammer
Mark Hammer
6 months ago

I dive split fins as my main fins. I have no problems Frog kicking or back kicking. I can also travel quickly through the water when I need to. Love your vlogs and watch all the time.

DirtyF Butler
DirtyF Butler
6 months ago

I like to use ASL under water, even if the person might not know the sign, it is usually pretty easy to figure out what I am saying.

Scott Blanch
Scott Blanch
6 months ago

As an underwater photographer I can spend 15mins or more trying to catch the perfect shot of something while my non photographer buddy gets irate because he/she would prefer to explore.

Ironized
Ironized
6 months ago

Also on the octo topic. Some regs have yellow primaries to signify that it’s a long hose-primary donate set up.

Looking at the Dive Rite XT2s

Ironized
Ironized
6 months ago

Atleast you didn’t say tank.

Dice
Dice
6 months ago

https://youtu.be/jLK3m8XeycE?t=665
Having a non experienced diver use his ‘own’ signals while being low on air … while it was clearly shown in the briefing we’re using
and him not asking for clarification DURING the briefing …

Ended up with him being at 20 bar at 8 meters depth …

I never lose patience; but this one really got close

abigmonkeyforme
abigmonkeyforme
6 months ago

6:11 Oh goodness, thank you for this! I’ve been teaching my students this for years: if your gear works for you, and you like it, don’t let anyone tell you it’s wrong!

Mark Hammer
Mark Hammer
Reply to  abigmonkeyforme
6 months ago

I agree. I am an instructor and see a lot of instructors that want everything set up their way not how it works for rhe diver.

spoofer20
spoofer20
7 months ago

The pinholes arent there in case of a leak, they are there because of gas diffusion, most likely because the hose is steel reinforced. It will trickle very small amounts of gas over time that cause the ballooning. Hoses are my profession.

spoofer20
spoofer20
7 months ago

They arent “cylinders” they are gas bottles.

jason brewer
jason brewer
7 months ago

FYI tanks fire non-explosive projectiles. Man it bugs me when divers say tanks blow things up. Lol just busting your chops

Team Peg Leg
Team Peg Leg
7 months ago

Looks at the Oxygen bottle that I take with me on nearly every dive.

Fisioterapeuta Francisco Trovão
Fisioterapeuta Francisco Trovão
7 months ago

1- when I am freediving I use the snorkel on the right side, its easyer to me to put it on and off.
When I am scubadiving I use it on my car’s boot… 😅

Brian Cohen
Brian Cohen
7 months ago

(Sing with me now) These are a few of my least favorite things: Divers with no situational awareness that swim into me or kick me in the face (put your head on a swivel in a 3-D environment; look left, right, up, and down while you manage your trim). Similarly, divers that swim into my field of view as I’m taking a video or photo of a subject. Braggarts that, at the end of each dive, declare without any solicitation how much air they have left. People that leave their rig on the bench directly above where I’ve clearly stowed my gear and claimed my space (shore diving only). Divers who deliberately touch coral. Faster dive buddies who never look back to see if you’re okay or even nearby. And, although I usually enjoy this channel, the poster, and the commenters, I am annoyed at how little it takes for people to be annoyed. If your world turns darker because someone’s snorkel is on the right (uh, wrong?) side, their octo is unsecured, the amount of someone’s gear seems excessive, a diver is using their arms for maneuvering or propulsion, they call it a tank instead of a cylinder, or anything else that doesn’t really affect you or the delicate environment, then you need a little thicker skin. Okay, I’m not perfect, and I concede that the air braggart thing is kinda picky: I’m a bit of a heavy breathing guy who dives with a full face mask.

EssentialAdventurer
EssentialAdventurer
7 months ago

Divers who touch everything- coral, animals, shells etc. Just leave it alone!

Bing Surjawan
Bing Surjawan
7 months ago

I now stick a mini rearview mirror on the back of my video light. I can see my magic buddy easily whichever side he or she stays on.

Andrew K
Andrew K
7 months ago

I use Right Snorkel becouse I tired anought to confuse it with BCD inflator.

Josh S
Josh S
7 months ago

I don’t wear a snorkel while diving, free diving of course

Paul Tyler
Paul Tyler
7 months ago

Noone wants to suit up too early but I like to take things slow and easy. I also don’t want to be the guy everyone is waiting for.. I like to have time to think and do things methodically.
I hate being interrupted when I’m doing SAFETY checks.

On one occasion as an inexperienced diver I was bullied onto the RIB by an aggressive dive leader, without my integrated weights being fitted.
It was embarrassing rather than dangerous and of course I missed that dive…
Now I point blank tell people “I’m not ready” if I’m not ready!

Ray Amis
Ray Amis
7 months ago

On breathing from the octo :- I was told that a reg. should be “used” to keep the insides loose. So I do try and end my dives with 5 or 10 mins. breathing from my “alternative”.

Crazy Scuba Couple
Crazy Scuba Couple
7 months ago

i hate force fins, innefficient, weak, looks goofy, promotes bad finning techniques, can’t back kick, can’t frog kick, next level overpriced, people that use them are adamant that are the best fins ever yet none of them have proper finning technique.

Brad Kemker
Brad Kemker
7 months ago

Divers who grab or touch the reef.

Robert Burns
Robert Burns
7 months ago

Dive masters who feel the need to tinker with your tank valve on your way off the boat. I know they’re just trying to double check for safety, but if you’re an experienced diver, you’ve set things the way you want them for your dive and you don’t want things changed.

PP O2
PP O2
Reply to  Robert Burns
5 months ago

The only time I’ve done that is when the entire boat is full of open water students,other than that i just remind people to do their buddy checks.

Helen Higgins
Helen Higgins
7 months ago

Zero to Hero’s who think they’re the Bee’s Knee’s.

Robert Parker
Robert Parker
7 months ago

How do you seal your mask with that muff on your lip? (Serious Question)

Scuba Diver Magazine
Scuba Diver Magazine
Reply to  Robert Parker
7 months ago

A combination of a mask with a really soft skirt, beard balm to help create a seal and just clearing the mask every now and then. I don’t dive CCRs much anymore so clearing your mask isn’t that much of a big deal. That and I’ve been using a lot of full face masks recently

Josh S
Josh S
Reply to  Robert Parker
7 months ago

Diving with a mustache/beard is easy. Just a bit of clearing

Christian Cattell
Christian Cattell
7 months ago

Kicking away in a tight area; being oblivious to divers near you…

Hunter Falkner
Hunter Falkner
7 months ago

Yeah the #1 most annoying thing ever is your buddy being completely out of sight because they prefer to see you very well followed closely by people not having any sort of control over their fins flutter kicking and blowing all the mud and dust everywhere. An extra point would be people taking snorkels on a dive in a lake, completely useless (for some reason that always happened with PADI divers, which I find curious).

Bing Surjawan
Bing Surjawan
Reply to  Hunter Falkner
7 months ago

I always have my J snorkel. For me it’s a handy tool for giving rescue breath while towing from behind. But in most cases its pretty helpful when the tank is low on air and the boat or the shore is still far while the sun is shining mid-day full bright and swimming face up is rather blinding.

Gordon Smith
Gordon Smith
7 months ago

Divers with GoPros on sticks 😡

geemac
geemac
7 months ago

The over excited buddy or group diver who continually taps you on the arm or leg and starts pointing frantically towards coral, fish or anything that grabs their attention without realising the ‘thing’ is blatantly obvious to you and other divers. I’ve used my slate on occasion to vent😡🤬😃 and get thr message across to ‘chill’ and enjoy👌🤿 the dive

Niklas
Niklas
Reply to  geemac
7 months ago

I usually give them the OK sign and we are done.

You would be surprised how bad situational awareness some people have when diving so what is obvious to you might not be for the next person.

But yes, can be annoying.. great another yellow fish …

PP O2
PP O2
Reply to  geemac
5 months ago

Funny that, because I’ve been busy as a DM pointing out that shark not 10m away and when i ask the group of they saw the shark, not one of them did. That happens a lot. So my gripe is blind divers.

Cosmic Gorilla
Cosmic Gorilla
7 months ago

Frankly, I’ve only ever been annoyed when they cram too many people on one boat, play thrash metal as they bounce along on the top of the waves THEN tell you to calm down whilst you are diving. The dive master makes you put on twice as much weight as you know you need as well, so your BCD is always partially inflated AND they don’t tell you about the 100MPH currents before you dive. But, “hey, you need to learn not to gulp!” From a 4’5″ bloke with a rainforest physique who dives at least ten times a week every week.

Actually, no, the thing that really grinds my gears is being ignored by the dive master at 15m when you point to your air pressure and give the thumbs up AND boat signal but he just continues the dive THEN he bollocks you because you are out of air at the mandatory decompression stop. So:

#1: bad fills, and then the excuse that it’s hot
#2: loud music and too much speed on the boat going out
#3: overweighting
#4: bad dive planning with currents being missed out
#5: bad attitude to safety
#6: no room on the boat
#7: no allowances for my frame and enforced overweighting when being called a gulper
#8: people messing around with your equipment, AFTER you’ve set it up and checked, it without telling you
#9: poorly maintained rental equipment
#10: dive buddies who swim off all the time and who you have to help through currents even though you are struggling yourself – then you get criticised for gulping!

Other than that nothing else bothers me at all. 🤿

Paul Tyler
Paul Tyler
Reply to  Cosmic Gorilla
7 months ago

You hit all 10 of my hates!!

Josh S
Josh S
Reply to  Cosmic Gorilla
7 months ago

Never allowed anyone to overweight me, period. That’s very odd to hear

Cosmic Gorilla
Cosmic Gorilla
Reply to  Cosmic Gorilla
7 months ago

@Josh S it’s normal in some places.

Josh S
Josh S
Reply to  Cosmic Gorilla
7 months ago

@Cosmic Gorilla That is a shame imo

PP O2
PP O2
Reply to  Cosmic Gorilla
5 months ago

Seems to me you’re going with the wrong dive centre.

jhare18
jhare18
7 months ago

👏👏👏👏👏👏🥇🥇🥇🥇🥇🥇🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆❤️❤️❤️

Hamish Comrie
Hamish Comrie
7 months ago

Divers on the boat being told over and over again before they get on the boat to take seasick tablets and tell you they don’t get seasick ,eat lunch and vomit all over themselves and the deck …

HashTagRealName
HashTagRealName
7 months ago

People *should* use their octo, at least periodically. That’s the best way to make sure it is working well!
It’s least you can do if you aren’t going to run long hose primary donate.

Related to this – people who just let their octo dangle into the sand/grit.

Mr. Beacher
Mr. Beacher
7 months ago

3:43 what about when the dive crew requests this and you’re renting their gear?

Scuba Diver Magazine
Scuba Diver Magazine
Reply to  Mr. Beacher
7 months ago

It’s their gear, if they want you to blow their valves then fine. But, I’d just announce it first so I don’t scare the dive deck.
I’ve never done it with my gear though, just dab it with a towel and pop the dust cap back on. Best way to keep water out of your regulator.

Mr. Beacher
Mr. Beacher
7 months ago

If you’re not scuba diving, shouldn’t your primary air source (snorkel) be on the right… 🤔🤫😜

Niklas
Niklas
Reply to  Mr. Beacher
7 months ago

When sidemount divig your “primary” cylinder is on the left (short hose, and the one you don first)

John Larson
John Larson
7 months ago

Mark, First – Thanks for what you do. I find it highly informative. Second – I believe it is time to replace the “I am OK” hand gesture with the “Thumbs Up” gesture. Above the water line the “Thumbs Up” is a universal symbol for I am good, great, groovy, or I have no issue. No one uses the “OK” gesture above the water any longer. To demonstrate my point, watch yourself (in the “Magic Buddy” portion of this video) and when you glance to your side and say, “Everything is Good” you give the thumbs Up (with both hands!). My recommendation is that the “Thumbs Up” gesture combined with a vertical (up & down) motion can mean time to surface. Who is with me?

Tim Gosling
Tim Gosling
7 months ago

In the US they are tanks. I can live with that. We’ve got used to saying “I’m good” when we mean “I’m well”, so just accept it’s two peoples separated by a common language.

Hellrazor
Hellrazor
7 months ago

Amazing how divers get lol

RCD566
RCD566
7 months ago

I never wore my snorkel on my mask strap. We were trained to wear our dive knives on the inside of the left calf and I just kept my snorkel tucked in behind the knife sheath.

Andrew ST
Andrew ST
7 months ago

I found that my split fins started to struggle as I increased my mass with a neoprene drysuit and extra thick thermals; we dive temperatures down to about 35F / 1.5C. While splits still worked, and are a great fin, I could feel the limits of them when finning. My paddle fins are far more efficient with my cold water setup. Yes, they take a tiny bit more effort to fin with, but the amount of propulsion per kick is far greater.

Going ‘hot water’ diving? Split fins are a great option!

Bruce Beattie
Bruce Beattie
Reply to  Andrew ST
7 months ago

I can’t speak to split fins being better or worse depending on the temperature but paddle fins are definitely the way to go if you’re in current. Being shorter and wider, they are also the ones that you want to be wearing in more confined spaces.

In fairness, split fins are wonderful in still water and you will likely notice some change in air consumption.

Stephen S2R
Stephen S2R
Reply to  Andrew ST
7 months ago

@Bruce Beattie I’m a cave diver and instructor and have been using splits for everything. They are especially handy when you’re heavy carrying lots of gear, but you have to be more careful not to stir up the sediment on the bottom and back finning is tricky and I guess they’re more likely to get tangled on something.

For technical diving I don’t use them the same way as in open water. You don’t need much force to use them, so in tight conditions or when using frog kicks all the movement comes from the ankles and not the knees or hips. Sounds and looks a little odd and goes against the cave diving community’s thinkings but after a while even my cave diving buddies changed their opinions. Its a lot less tiering.

DTT
DTT
7 months ago

people who dive using there hands/arms for propulsion constantly

suikakujun
suikakujun
7 months ago

“Patos” and “Careta” is the way to annoy divers in Spain 😉

Paolo Maraziti
Paolo Maraziti
7 months ago

#askmark …. if you move from an primary plus octo (e.g. yellow) to long hose and chin hanging reg, I guess makes sense to get get an other color hose for the octo, would you change also the octopus to a normal regulator ?

Scuba Diver Magazine
Scuba Diver Magazine
Reply to  Paolo Maraziti
7 months ago

Sure, most Octo hoses only tend to be 100cm long so you usually need to invest in an extra hose anyway. The colour is very much up to you. Most divers use a standard black hose because they’re the most available. Colourful hoses can be useful to differentiate the hoses and prevent tangles.

As far as the 2nd stage itself, it again mainly comes down to aesthetics, you can ask a service technician to adjust the 2nd stage so that it breathes the same as your primary. You may also be able to get a replacement front cover. If your primary and AAS are different models then most divers invest in a second primary so that they perform the same in the water.

Paolo Maraziti
Paolo Maraziti
Reply to  Paolo Maraziti
7 months ago

@Scuba Diver Magazine Thank youuuuuu

Brian Cohen
Brian Cohen
Reply to  Paolo Maraziti
7 months ago

For what it’s worth, I followed my diver instructor’s advice and bought a normal regulator, instead of a puck, for my octo. Yes, it’s more expensive. But it’s higher quality, more dependable, and easier to breathe with (which could calm down the diver that needs it). Because it’s easier to breathe from than a puck, I’m more motivated to use it on occasion to make sure it’s functioning properly.

Paolo Maraziti
Paolo Maraziti
Reply to  Paolo Maraziti
7 months ago

Well. I have switched my octo for a twin model of my primary and moving to a king hose setup today. Looking forward to the first comments on the boat about the fact I don’t have an Octo 😂

Brian Cohen
Brian Cohen
Reply to  Paolo Maraziti
7 months ago

@Paolo Maraziti For what it’s worth, I haven’t yet gotten a comment about my “regular” octo.

Alison Anthony
Alison Anthony
7 months ago

Every now and then, I’ll breathe from my octo during a dive for a couple minutes. It’s for my peace of mind, so I know it’s working properly if it’s ever needed – my lizard brain nags me if I don’t check it regularly.

The thing that annoys me is divers not looking before they jump into the water. Just look down guys and give me a couple of seconds to surface and move away from the boat. I don’t need you plummeting down onto my head!! In the same vein, , when you’re on a rhib and you discuss with the people sitting next to you which way you’re going to roll back and they STILL throw themselves the wrong way and you end up with a face full of cylinder! A cylinder to the face hurts – ask me how I know! 😅

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