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230823 gauge mode


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Truthslight
Truthslight
5 months ago

#askmark
Hi Mark, do most rebreathers have transmitters? I ask because some high end color screen dive computers (e.g. ScubaPro G3) mention CCR modes, but they don’t have any underwater external connection points (the Shearwater Petrel or Nerd come to mind). I would imagine for a computer to be in a CCR mode it should know the PPO2. Am I just missing some context or do those CCR modes just assume a particular PPO2 to set your dive profile?

Scuba Diver Magazine
Scuba Diver Magazine
Reply to  Truthslight
5 months ago

CCR modes on stand-alone computers tend to have a fixed PPO2 that you set before the dive and the computer assumes that the rebreather is maintaining that PPO2 throughout the dive. They’re used more as an approximation as a backup to the computer fitted to your rebreather.

Transmitters only really transmit cylinder pressure. You can connect transmitters to the 1st stages on the rebreather and pair them to the computer so that you can monitor your O2 and Diluent levels.

A Petrel or a NERD with a Fischer cable will be able to plug into certain rebreathers for all of the data but, not a stand alone unit.

Chris Philhower
Chris Philhower
5 months ago

Hello. I have a Genesis Centauri computer. Sherwood(Manufacturer) told me to put in Gauge Mode when I am Swimming, Breath Holding my College Pool. It didn’t take long for “No Fly” and “No Dive” to appear in Watch Mode. Took 24 Hours to Clear. The Computer went into a Locked condition. Where it began a Countdown before I could do the next Freedive. Then restarted when I did one. Annoying. I don’t use it. FD Mode at least tracks my Depth and Duration. And Surface Interval

Emmy Lee
Emmy Lee
5 months ago

#askmark hey mark, I am currently in the market for a rebreather. These are the ones I did trial dives on: JJ in normal and GUE config, T-Reb, XCcR, rEvo and Liberty (backmount). I don’t really know which factors to consider when deciding on the right unit! I loved the JJ in GUE config but it is impractical as I am a woman weighing 60kg and it’s too heavy to handle for me into the boat and on land. I loved the rEvo for its lightness and the scrubber alignment but heard some criticism about its reliability. Buying cost isn’t a factor but maintenance could be. Thanks in advance.
#askmark

Scuba Diver Magazine
Scuba Diver Magazine
Reply to  Emmy Lee
5 months ago

Maintenance costs and availability are important to consider with reliability, you don’t want to be diagnosing problems and replacing parts all of the time and find it hard to get those parts.

It really comes down to which suits your diving style. JJs are widely considered strong all-rounders and reliable for their simplicity. But if it’s going to be a pain for you out of the water then it pushes it down the list. I wouldn’t demonize rEvos based on a handful of accounts online. Many divers love the compact design and they’re constantly improving.

You’ll find criticism about most units online if you look hard enough

Emmy Lee
Emmy Lee
Reply to  Emmy Lee
5 months ago

@Scuba Diver Magazinethank you for your kind answer. I as I am based in the EU I will probably tend towards a EU certified unit with support available.

geemac
geemac
5 months ago

#ASKMARK Hi Mark. You may have addressed aspects of my question in past videos however; I’m considering an equipment upgrade using nitrox initially and trimix later. I ask if you could shed some light on the positives or negatives of using twin back and twin side mount tanks. Which setup offers greater practicality in a general diving environment and occasional wreck dives. I welcome your thoughts. Regards, geemac

Scuba Diver Magazine
Scuba Diver Magazine
Reply to  geemac
5 months ago

For me, I prefer back-mounted twins, they’re just solid and less fuss, especially in colder waters * but* , sidemount often has more benefits.

The benefits of twins are that you can complete the entire dive without switching 2nd stages and they’re very simple. They’re trickier to transport, because you have to move both cylinders together and if you’re travelling it can be tricky to rent twins in some places. And you only really dive with one gas mix on your back.

Sidemount is more flexible but, requires more specialised gear and training. It’s easier to transport gear and you’re more flexible in the water but, it takes some practice and organisation. It’s easier to rent two single cylinders when travelling and you’re more stable in the water.

geemac
geemac
Reply to  geemac
5 months ago

@Scuba Diver Magazine Hi Mark. Thanks for replying. I appreciate your advice and as such agree that a twins setup will offer greater flexibility than side mounts. Cheers

D_ Fresh1
D_ Fresh1
5 months ago

I recently replaced my Perdix with a fancy new Perdix, so I now keep my old one in Gauge Mode, just as a redundant backup as well…/s

I’m kidding, of course, why would anyone replace any DC with the same model…. I really just wanted to say nice vid, and good explanation of Dive Mode. In my experience, it seems to be pretty standard across manufacturers, and while it’s a seemingly small role, can be pretty beneficial for a backup DC to be in gauge mode. Cheers from the Philippines mate, looking forward to the next video.

David Bonnichsen
David Bonnichsen
5 months ago

Gauge mode is all you need. I never dive in full computer mode any longer unless I’m on trimix/heliox. I really wish these agencies would start teaching this way…would save new divers a considerable amount of money.

Mark Sallows
Mark Sallows
Reply to  David Bonnichsen
5 months ago

Why worry about other diver’s budgets? Let’s face it, scuba is not a cheap sport, and if a diver can benefit from the safety features in a top quality computer while over time developing dive skills, then why not? I would modify your statement to say gauge mode is all a diver needs “eventually”. As much as you believe all agencies should teach “this way” and by that I assume you mean tables, one would be naive to believe it’s going to happen. Why? Diving like most pursuits has become big business, and time is money. Teaching tables/RDP is more time consuming (I learnt that way and relearned through DM and again in OWSI), and ultimately, for the “casual” diver, modern computers are safer, with bright colourful screens NDL limit alarms, MOD and rapid ascent warnings. AI brings added benefits of RBT/SAC Rate The other factor that gets forgotten, is that with diminished eyesight that comes with age, computers are simply easier to read. I struggled with some earlier models especially in low light, but my Shearwater Perdix AI (like Mark has in the video), has been a joy to use over the last 7 years I’ve owned it. I’ll probably buy another soon for redundancy and ditch my gauge console (except in sidemount, where I can run gauges too).

Mr. Beacher
Mr. Beacher
Reply to  David Bonnichsen
5 months ago

Likely controversial but IMHO new divers should not use Guage mode. Most dive accidents are a result of diver error. Having the computer help double check you, even if you’re skilled at RDP, is a no brainer (literally). Why recommend new divers assume more unnecessary risk?

Mark Sallows
Mark Sallows
Reply to  David Bonnichsen
5 months ago

@Mr. Beacher totally agree. Some of these experience divers and Tech divers seem to forget that they were new once and although like me, they were probably talk dive tables most agencies don’t now so we have to deal with that, and a computer is that redundancy office a layer of protection for the new diver.

David Bonnichsen
David Bonnichsen
Reply to  David Bonnichsen
5 months ago

@Mark Newman Sallows kinda exactly my point…”eventually” divers realize computers do them no good for the normal dives they do. The only reason agencies now teach with computers is to make money for the manufacturers. Period. For 95% of the divers out there gauge mode is just fine…even with EAN32 as long as you know the limits. ANY diver who goes under knows the risks and they had better be knowledgeable enough.

Sebastian Lauwers
Sebastian Lauwers
5 months ago

Hi Mark, in a recent podcast you mentioned that the Teric doesn’t have a free dive mode, however I believe it does; and I believe it’s had it since launch. I’ve used it a few times, ever since I’ve had the Teric.

D G
D G
5 months ago

Contrary to popular opinion, reading the manual for your dive computer will not put you at risk of having your man card revoked. 😉

Sam Moyers
Sam Moyers
Reply to  D G
5 months ago

My Man Card was revoked many years ago for not only reading instruction manuals, but for asking directions before the advent of GPS…. 🙃🙂

Robin Moerland
Robin Moerland
5 months ago

RTFM? Yes of course, but hey autist talking. I know every blip, corner and function of my dive computer. So yes people should RTFM. #autisticrant #reeeeeee

391wombat
391wombat
5 months ago

I still don’t understand why you would use it even as a backup. If your main computer goes down, its dive over. Who’s going to continue a dive in gauge mode with no NDL information. If you brought table’s with you maybe, but who does that realistically.

Gnisha
Gnisha
Reply to  391wombat
5 months ago

There is no reason for a backup in recreational diving from my perspective.
It can be very important for a technical dive which should be planned with a detailed depth profile and gas planning.
You should always stay below the profile and then you can use your plan with the backup to continue to dive your plan.

Erik
Erik
Reply to  391wombat
5 months ago

Most of my rec and tec dives are done in gauge mode. There are only specific situation when I would use the built in algorithms eg on a liveaboard with many dives per day and lots of multi level dives.

PP O2
PP O2
Reply to  391wombat
5 months ago

Unless all you dive are u shaped dive profiles ,then just refer to regular tables.

PP O2
PP O2
Reply to  391wombat
5 months ago

So you dont multi level dive?@Gnisha

Gnisha
Gnisha
Reply to  391wombat
5 months ago

Not for the sake of technical dive planning, most of these are wreck dives.
But even then you can easily have a multi level deco dive planned on a slate.
You need to know in advance that you have sufficient gas for all deco stops. There really should be no suprise at all and always a conservative dive profile to return to.
@PP O2

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