Top 10 Pro Diver Skills & Traits #scuba #top10 @ScubaDiverMagazine


Top 10 Pro Diver Skills & Traits #scuba #top10 @ScubaDiverMagazine
Habits and skills from the best scuba divers.
#scuba #scubadiving #scubadiver
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00:00 Introduction
00:49 Gear Checks
02:23 Honesty Policy
03:52 Clear Communication
05:56 Be Prepared
07:47 Self Sufficient
10:16 Routines
11:45 Calm
13:15 Enthusiasm
14:24 Frog Kick
15:40 Limitation

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Bloody Marvelous
Bloody Marvelous
7 months ago

“You’re not the sign language person at an Eminem show”

That had me laughing out loud 🤣

Lauren Polson
Lauren Polson
7 months ago

Am I right in saying a frog kick is not the same as a breastroke kick? But a tighter version of one?

Scuba Diver Magazine
Scuba Diver Magazine
Reply to  Lauren Polson
7 months ago

They’re pretty similar. It’s the same action just with small variations and finer control

Lauren Polson
Lauren Polson
Reply to  Lauren Polson
7 months ago

@Scuba Diver Magazine Thanks for your reply!

Main reason for asking was that on my OW course, a fellow student was doing full on breaststroke kicks (and occasionally arms) when everyone else was flutter kicking including our instructor. They almost knocked out my buddy with a kick so was wondering if it was correct to move like that or not. I know my buddy probably could have stayed further away and did after that!

optionchuc1
optionchuc1
7 months ago

This is why training is so important, and why they drill over and over to “what can go wrong” … so there is no thinking, just acting…

Adventures with Frodo
Adventures with Frodo
7 months ago

Picture of the diver with sidmounted tanks is a VERY specialized set up so POS picture.
Guess your just a noob who doesn’t know much.

Peter OShaughnessy
Peter OShaughnessy
7 months ago

Great accomplishment you a well on your way to 500 K and more. my favorite dive watch is my Tag Huer dive watch that has been flooded and repaired several times. Unfortunately I no longer use it because I dive with 2 computers a primary and a backup.

Kelley Hudson
Kelley Hudson
8 months ago

I am a new diver, thank you sir.

Scuba Diver Magazine
Scuba Diver Magazine
Reply to  Kelley Hudson
8 months ago

Welcome to the gang

Paul Tyler
Paul Tyler
8 months ago

Thanks Mark, great video as always.
When I started diving I was told “If you buy cheap, you’ll buy twice”. Sounds like good advice, but is it really?

For example dive computers. It can be difficult for a new diver to see what the difference is between a Shearwater Perdix 2 (€1300), a Shearwater Peregrine (€580) and a Cressi Leonardo (€150)?
From a novice divers point of view they all do the same job.

The same goes for BCDs, Octos pretty much everything … I spent days (weeks) reading reports, reviews (watching your videos) and taking to divers before investing in mine..

Finally a Pro Tip from my friend who is a MD. Ask yourself the question “does your life depend on it?” If the answer is yes, spend as much as you can afford on that item. Concentrate on your regulators, BCD, dive computer before you worry about which snazzy pair of fins will look best with your new wetsuit.

Doug Bryan
Doug Bryan
8 months ago

What is going on at 15:07 – 15:23? That looks so amazing!

Nicolás Sanguinetti
Nicolás Sanguinetti
Reply to  Doug Bryan
8 months ago

The diver starts gliding normally, and then by the end of that clip they are starting a helicopter kick / helicopter turn. Search for videos on this technique, it’s extremely useful and efficient! (Specially when you’re in more confined environments like a canyon or overhead environments like a cave or inside a wreck).

douglaw99
douglaw99
8 months ago

Thanks Mark! Love these longer videos 👏🏻

RangerVudoo
RangerVudoo
9 months ago

It’s amazing, as others have said, how stuff transfers to different tasks in life. Coming from a fire service background, most if not all transfers almost 100%. People kinda laugh when I tell them I have a knife in each pocket in my turnout gear but when I explain that I never know if something should happen which one’s id have access to, it clicks in. Or just staying calm, which granted is easier said than done, but just taking a second to regroup will go leaps and bounds into solving your issues.

Charlemagne
Charlemagne
9 months ago

How about keeping your scuba knowledge up to date by reading a book on relevant subject matters once in a while, or following quality YouTube scuba channels (can you recommend any 😉)?

Andrew 21
Andrew 21
9 months ago

who can tell me why its Scuba diver Magazine now where is “Simply scuba”?

Scuba Diver Magazine
Scuba Diver Magazine
Reply to  Andrew 21
9 months ago

The company that owned Simply Scuba recently went into administration. I moved over to Scuba Diver Magazine last year for a change of pace and a few other reasons.

Dive_With_Matt
Dive_With_Matt
9 months ago

During my DM training ( and previous work ) Plan everything out. I’m If I’m doing a course, be it at the pool or open water, I arrive 30 mins – 2 hours before students to go over my kit, check conditions and do a check dive if possible. Myself and another DM where doing a check dive at swanage pier prior to students turning up, and we voiced concerns about the current & swell to the shops Master Instructor. It ended up being 1 student per PRO level diver, where as the instructor could usually handle 4 students herself. We aired on the side of caution due to the experience and trust within the team.

Daniel Ricardo
Daniel Ricardo
9 months ago

Pro divers treat their gauges as verification tools rather than information tools. For example, before a pro diver checks their SPG, they can estimate what it should read based on the dive time and depth, and their own SAC rate. This way, if the value is off – they know something is wrong (gas leak, broken SPG, over exertion…)

Alias Incognito
Alias Incognito
9 months ago

Some of these traits apply elsewhere as well. I’m a skydiver and acrobatic pilot. In my case, any error no matter its degree, can result in my death. Pre flight checks of my parachute or aircraft is essential. Things happen quickly in the sky, and it needs to be fixed within a few seconds or less otherwise it will literally spiral out of control. SCUBA is arguably much more tame but a similar mindset is still necessary. Keep calm, asses the situation, and execute based on your training and experience.

WhaleShark
WhaleShark
9 months ago

I think proactive on the dive boat if they see something untoward. i.e. I will always try to lash a cylinder down if I see it loose and there’s no diver near it. Similarly I will try to gently ask someone if I see they have missed a key step (tank valve is still closed, mask isn’t on their face etc.).

EnergiZe
EnergiZe
9 months ago

Pro diver tip: warch mark’s Videos

Joseph dracula
Joseph dracula
9 months ago

😎👍🇵🇭🤿! You really hit on key points and I enjoyed the way you presented pro tip’s and learned also!

SkyBlockPlayer
SkyBlockPlayer
9 months ago

I Learned since my Rescue course, 5 Years ago that im not the best diver but I can survive, I know what I’m doing and be able to help others 😀
Now I’m a Padi OWSI here in Germany and I learned that our hobby is f*cking expensive 😂

Now serious:
Establishing a routine is really important for me. When I’m assembling and checking my gear I don’t wanna get disturbed.
The next best thing, I Learned from you Mark: Emotional support BoltSnap.
I really try to have one in my pocket from the W7 or D9X just in case… And at the IE it safed one of my team mates because there shoulder buckle got damaged during rescue 7. And with the BoltSnap he was able to secure it so he can make the evaluation.

Tim Gosling
Tim Gosling
9 months ago

How about learning to maintain situational awareness outside your own little world?

Kenneth J McArthur
Kenneth J McArthur
Reply to  Tim Gosling
9 months ago

Agree, both in and out of the water. Some dive boats are more crowded. Some divers lag behind the group. Being assigned a dive buddy who then goes off on their own.

Alfa INC
Alfa INC
Reply to  Tim Gosling
6 months ago

Oh so you 😂 talking about your dive buddy lmao

Paul Dawson
Paul Dawson
9 months ago

Hi, Second recent mention of the frog quick. Second recent suggestion of a frog kick video. 🐸 #askmark

Daveador
Daveador
9 months ago

Hi Mark, watching you from Saracen Bay, Cambodia where I’m doing my Dive Master.

Lenny Zimmermann
Lenny Zimmermann
9 months ago

#ASKMARK Thanks, as always, for the great videos. One of the best resources out there I’ve found so please keep up the great work! My question has to do with breathing (something it seems to me is another bit trait of pro divers, particularly as it relates to buoyancy). Most of the agencies talk about breathing “normally” or taking deep, steady, breaths and/or exhaling fully, but it seems to me this very much skips over why we need breath control and, in particular, using breathing for buoyancy control. I’ve watched many dive videos and if you count how long a particular, professional, calm, neutrally buoyant and in trim diver breathes in versus breathing out even those can be vastly different (and not at all which I would think of as a normal, calm, breathing cycle). For example sitting here calmly now I may breath in for, say 4 seconds to maybe 40 or 50 percent of my lung capacity and exhale for another 4 seconds with a pause for another second before inhaling again. While not always consistent I often see where it would appear a diver might be somewhat consistently breathing in for 5 seconds and then breath out for all of maybe 2 seconds while staying perfectly still in their buoyancy and trim. Is there something I’m missing as to why that might be the case instead of a steady rhythm?

I would further note that normal breathing doesn’t use our full lung capacity. At the bottom of my breathing cycle I can force exhale more air from my lungs (and sometimes do when getting under from the surface or to lower my current depth a bit) and breath a bit more shallow to change depths. Conversely at the upper end I could sip in more air than a full breath would consist of, although I don’t see too many reasons for doing that and it has the potential for being a bit dangerous as you are likely ascending in that case and wouldn’t want air expanding in the lungs like that. When trying to get neutral since my normal breathing cycle is at the lower end of lung capacity should I be aiming to be neutral while breathing in that range of my lungs, or should I aim for breathing more in the middle of my capacity instead to give extra “room” to exhale more to go deeper if needed? I rarely see any discussion, at least not on most videos on buoyancy or any of the training I’ve seen or even in the Perfect Buoyancy class I’ve had with SSI that really talks about the in-depth details of lung capacity and vast range we have in how we breath and how to optimize that for diving, only what I had noted above and that we can use our lungs as our primary BCD for maintaining buoyancy. Well if it’s a primary tool why don’t we see more details about how to really use that tool?

Scuba Diver Magazine
Scuba Diver Magazine
Reply to  Lenny Zimmermann
9 months ago

It’s very personal to each diver to find that _happy spot_ and comfortable lung volume. There’s no right or wrong answer and I tend to make myself neutral somewhere in the upper end of my tidal volume so that I can hold my breath a short while without ascending.

As far as breathing cycle, the foundational courses are more concerned about training new divers to *never* hold their breath. So they will use phrases like ‘always breath normally’ to encourage divers to not hold their breath, ascend and hurt themselves. As you gain experience and can better control your buoyancy and depth, you can hold your breath as long as you don’t do it while ascending

That Vegan Shark
That Vegan Shark
9 months ago

Hi Mark

Leopold Bloom
Leopold Bloom
9 months ago

3:33 😂

EnergiZe
EnergiZe
Reply to  Leopold Bloom
9 months ago

🤔

Henry Goleau
Henry Goleau
7 months ago

Being physically fit.

Jeff Conley
Jeff Conley
5 months ago

Most of my diving has been off the east coast of FL. Usually fairly short distance to sites. So, as soon as everyone is onboard and equipment stowed, I assemble and check my gear. This way I have plenty of time to fix equipment for myself or other’s. And not dealing with the mass of people trying to get ready latter.

Jeff Conley
Jeff Conley
5 months ago

Good idea 👍 First time I have heard about repeating hand signals back👌

Ron Rogers
Ron Rogers
5 months ago

Pre-dive briefs and post-dive debriefs are critical to understanding and learning. Check lists are intended to slow you down so you don’t miss something important. Proper diet, hydration and fitness.

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